Dusking (March 2011)

Here is the picture I did for the Cairnwood Gala, with inspiration drawn from Maxfield Parrish.

I remember my first studio art class freshman year of college – the sort with easels.  We students stood besmocked,  holding pieces of charcoal, looking over either our left or right shoulders – depending on our handedness – at a posing fellow-classmate for our gesture drawings.   We all looked like “real” artists, gazing at our model and glancing now and then at our easels as we made sweeping motions with our arms.

“Use your whole arm!” said our teacher.  “Make those figures take up the whole paper.  The whole paper!  They can go off the page if you need to!  Loosen up that arm.”  I could have gesture-drawn all day.  I love the feel of charcoal on newsprint.  And I felt one with the artist community, knowing that Howard Pyle and NC Wyeth and Bouguereau and Rembrandt and all the Renaissance greats had probably stood in their studios using great sweeping strokes, wearing spattered smocks and funny flat cloth caps.

I have a table-easel now.  I generally use it on the floor, and I sit on the ground to draw from it.  I don’t look like a Renaissance great.  And at the moment I’m working on a pastel where the carefully blended sky will be in danger from the pastel crumbling down from leaves and branches if I work on it upright.  I realised it needed to be flat, so I’m not using my easel at all.

What do you think my art professor would think if she could see me now?

All my weight is on my elbow, and my left hand is gripping my right tricep to fully support that arm.   It seemed like a natural enough position at the time, but partway through the absurdity of it hit me.

Loosen up that arm. Use your whole arm.

I had to laugh.  Do all artists stand at their easels in their smocks, using free and easy strokes, or do some of them end up stretched out on their bedroom floors, in odd contorted positions, clutching their arms to steady their shaking hands?


Confessions, anyone?

Welcome to my site.

I’ve had a busy day today, working on a piece for the Dream Garden Gala being held at the Cairnwood Estate in March.  The theme is Maxfield Parrish, and I was just at the Delaware Art Museum on Wednesday, looking at Circe’s Palace which was on display there. Maxfield Parrish amazes me.  No matter how close I went to that painting, I couldn’t see a single brushstroke.  It looks as flawless from several inches away as it does shrunken down to book-size.

So I’m experimenting on pastelbord, using my fingers to smudge the pastel together, trying to create something stroke-free that will evoke Maxfield Parrish.  Anyone who’s worked with pastel will know that the medium doesn’t lend itself to fine detail.  I’m using a colour scheme that’s unusual for me, mimicking his Parrish blue skies by layering what blues I have on hand.

It’s a fascinating exercise, trying to use another artist’s palate.  The subject – a boy swinging from a tree – is very much my own, but I’m grateful for the chance to stretch my repertoire, to use colours together that I never would otherwise.  I have an unconscious eye for what hues balance each other out, but that eye is complacent, and not very inventive.

I’ll post the final product on here at some point.  Wish me luck!

I’ve been gradually adding more photos and text, and I will continue to add more in the coming weeks.  Thanks for your patience, those of you who have been waiting to see the pictures go up.  Enjoy looking around, and if you have any questions, just email me,

Ayisha.Synnestvedt@gmail.com

Thanks!

Ayisha

 

 

Copyright 2010-2011 Ayisha Synnestvedt.  All rights reserved.  Artwork images at this site may not be duplicated or redistributed in any form without express permission.  If you would like to use images from this site, please contact the artist for permission.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.